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A year of wars in review

I just found this little article on the strategy page. I usually don’t go there with these folks as they are not exactly known to be the most informed BUT they are interesting every once in a while. Sure, I’d be better off to link up with Small Wars Journal … but this is a comic site. No comes here expecting seriousness. :-)
January 1, 2011: Worldwide violence continues to decline, but most people are unaware of this because the mass media will feature whatever wars and disorder they can find. This is an old journalistic technique, and it’s good for business. But not so helpful if you are trying to keep track of what’s really happening out there. Oddly enough, the most bloody conflicts (like Congo) get the least media coverage. Reporting tends to be distorted by how accessible wars are, as well as how easily your viewers could identify with the combatants. The media also has a hard time keeping score. For years, Iraq was portrayed as a disaster until, suddenly, the enemy was crushed and the war was won. Even that was not considered exciting enough to warrant much attention, and that story is still poorly covered. Same pattern is playing out in Afghanistan, where the defeats of the Taliban, and triumph of the drug gangs, go unreported or distorted. If you step back and take a look at all the wars going on, a more accurate picture emerges
Read the rest: here Enjoy! And welcome to the new year. (remember… don’t believe everything you read and only have of what you see)


Pin-Ups For Vets And Cooking With The Troops Partner For Operation Fight Post Holiday Blues

I’m late in putting this out but here it is from LaughingWolf- The post-holiday blues can be bad enough on those who are healthy, and fully engaged in their normal activities. Stop for a moment and consider what it might be like for a member of the U.S. or Allied forces who find themselves evacuated to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. The time between Thanksgiving and New Year’s has been like a fire-hose of attention, visits, and more. Then, suddenly, it’s gone. They are alone in a hospital, in a foreign country, and away from friends, family, and normal support networks. Despite the dedicated efforts of staff and volunteers, the blues can hit hard. Recognizing that, Gina Elise of the non-profit Pin-Ups for Vets (pinupsforvets.com) and Cooking with the Troops (cwtt.org) have partnered to create Operation Fight Post Holiday Blues. This special event, timed for mid-January to have maximum effect, will combine a special dinner for a planned 150 people cooked by Guest Chef Ellen Adams (redhotdish.com), with hospital and other visits by Gina to help drive the blues away. To aid this effort, the team is being joined by author Michael Z. Williamson (michaelzwilliamson.com), who will also do visits, autographs, and give away books. Full details on the event can be found at http://cwtt.org/opfphblues.html and all participants are available for interviews. To do this event, Pin-Ups for Vets and Cooking with the Troops are looking to raise $15,000. Donations can be made by mail, or online at http://cwtt.org/donations.html via PayPal. Donors can note on the donation that it is for Operation Fight Post-Holiday Blues. Any funds raised that are not used will be used to support future operations at Pin-Ups for Vets and Cooking with the Troops. Larger versions of the attached images are available at http://cwtt.org/opfphblues.html or through the contacts listed below. Links: http://cwtt.org/opfphblues.html http://cwtt.org http://pinupsforvets.com/ http://www.redhotdish.com/index.html http://www.michaelzwilliamson.com/index.php Cooking with the Troops is a 501(c)(3) public charity dedicated to supporting U.S. and Allied Troops, their families, and caregivers through special food events, culinary careers, front line support, and homefront support. For more information, please contact Susan Katz Keating, Director of Communications, at skeating@cwtt.org or C. Blake Powers, CEO, at ceo@cwtt.org.

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